Is the flu shot better than the flu mist?

No. Both versions of the flu vaccine are equally effective at protecting against the influenza virus. In past years, the injectable flu shot offered better protection than the nasal spray, but this year both are equally as effective.

However, parents should talk to their pediatrician about which flu vaccine is recommended for their child. Children need to be at least 2 years old to receive the nasal spray vaccine. The flu nasal spray is not recommended for anyone with chronic lung problems like asthma or for anyone with a compromised immune system.

Will getting the flu vaccine put my child at greater risk for contracting COVID-19?

No. The flu vaccine will not put your child at greater risk for getting COVID-19, but it also won’t prevent them from getting COVID-19.

Can my child get COVID-19 from the flu vaccine?

No. Your child will not get COVID-19 from the flu vaccine.

The flu vaccine does not contain coronavirus. It contains inactive influenza virus or proteins from an influenza virus, which means getting a flu vaccine will not cause you or your child to get the flu or test positive for COVID-19 or any coronavirus.

Can my child get the flu from the flu vaccine?

No, a flu vaccine cannot cause the flu.

Flu shots are currently made with either flu vaccine viruses that have been killed (inactivated) and are therefore not infectious, or with proteins from a flu vaccine virus. The nasal spray is made with attenuated (weakened) flu viruses, and also cannot cause the flu. These weakened viruses are cold-adapted, which means they are designed to only cause infection at the cooler temperatures found within the nose. The viruses cannot infect the lungs or other warm areas.

Reports of illness after flu vaccine are typically due to side effects from the vaccine, or from unrelated viral illnesses that also tend to circulate during the time of year that flu shots are administered. Typical side effects from the flu vaccine include soreness (if given the flu shot), congestion (if given the nasal spray), cough, fever, body aches, headache and fatigue. Serious side effects are rare and less common than the severe complications that occur from the flu itself.

I got the flu vaccine and still got the flu!  Why?

Scientists make predictions about what flu strains will circulate the following year when they prepare the flu vaccine. In most years, these predictions result in a flu vaccine that provides significant protection, but there is still a chance you or your child may contract a strain that is not included in the vaccine.

Subscribe to our newsletter and get free parenting tips delivered to your inbox every week!

Related Content

person being vaccinated
flu vaccine and needle
little boy getting flu shot
Young boy and his teddy bear wearing face masks
child quarantined at home
baby with stethoscope
mother measuring temperature of sick child
child getting a vaccine
Mother wearing a homemade protective mask and putting one to her daughter
sick boy in bed
woman nursing baby
germs
COVID-19 written on mask
boy in front of board with question marks
dad talking to daughter
woman washing her hands
Shot Record Close Up
Tick insect warning sign
girl with headache
0 replies

Leave a Comment

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.